the-bionic-boy:

candylandtimelord:

she-doesnt-wear-any-wings:

cuteminimo
on etsy

Is that mannequin single?

why you no wear clothes like this. multiply your already sexiness by 100 and you have death sexy

http://theleesshop.com/index.php

(Source: miggylol, via acydfixation)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Skeletons by Patrick Gries

Spectacular, mysterious, elegant, or grotesque, vertebrate skeletons are objects of art, while they carry within them the traces of several billion years of evolution.  


(via juugatsuhoshi)

sendmetoasia:

奈良井宿 Narai-juku by Araiguma Rascal on Flickr.

paleoillustration:

The rise of the mammals, by the Kennis brothers

ask-bartolomeo:

"I’M SENDING EVERY LAST ONE OF YOU SHITHEADS STRAIGHT TO HELL" - Bartolomeo

FUCK YEAH

(Source: shiroyoh)

Tags: one piece

ancientart:

Carved head thought to represent Quetzalcoatl found at Teotihuacan, similar to the type seen at the Temple of Quetzalcoatl. Such sculptures adorned the doorways and patios of temples and dwelling units, as well as the facades of the latter.
Teotihuacan (‘the place where the gods were created’) is about 50 km north-east of Mexico City, and was built between the 1st and 7th centuries AD. A prominent feature at this archaeological site is the Temple of Quetzalcoatl (sometimes also referred to as the Temple of the Plumed Serpent), which is where this carved head likely came from.
One of the most important gods of the Aztec pantheon, Quetzalcoatl is a creator god, and the patron of merchants, knowledge, and crafts.

Quetzalcoatl, the Feathered Serpent, is a very complex god, with many aspects and spheres of influence. 
According to an Aztec myth of creation there were four suns (or worlds) before the present one. Each sun was created and destroyed in a different way, and inhabited by a different race of people. Each sun was also presided over by a different deity.
After the destruction of the Fourth Sun, Quetzalcoatl and Tezcatlipoca created the earth and the heavens by tearing apart the earth monster, Tlaltecuhtli.
-Clara Bezanilla, A Pocket Dictionary of Aztec and Mayan Gods and Goddesses.

Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Teotihuacan Museum, Mexico. Photo taken by Travis S.

ancientart:

Carved head thought to represent Quetzalcoatl found at Teotihuacan, similar to the type seen at the Temple of Quetzalcoatl. Such sculptures adorned the doorways and patios of temples and dwelling units, as well as the facades of the latter.

Teotihuacan (‘the place where the gods were created’) is about 50 km north-east of Mexico City, and was built between the 1st and 7th centuries AD. A prominent feature at this archaeological site is the Temple of Quetzalcoatl (sometimes also referred to as the Temple of the Plumed Serpent), which is where this carved head likely came from.

One of the most important gods of the Aztec pantheon, Quetzalcoatl is a creator god, and the patron of merchants, knowledge, and crafts.

Quetzalcoatl, the Feathered Serpent, is a very complex god, with many aspects and spheres of influence. 

According to an Aztec myth of creation there were four suns (or worlds) before the present one. Each sun was created and destroyed in a different way, and inhabited by a different race of people. Each sun was also presided over by a different deity.

After the destruction of the Fourth Sun, Quetzalcoatl and Tezcatlipoca created the earth and the heavens by tearing apart the earth monster, Tlaltecuhtli.

-Clara Bezanilla, A Pocket Dictionary of Aztec and Mayan Gods and Goddesses.

Artifact courtesy & currently located at the Teotihuacan Museum, Mexico. Photo taken by Travis S.

aestheticgoddess:

Women in the Garden, Claude Monet, 1866

aestheticgoddess:

Women in the Garden, Claude Monet, 1866

(via polyeucte-de-melitena)

bluepueblo:


Entry Gate, Chengdu, China
photo by marcus

bluepueblo:

Entry Gate, Chengdu, China

photo by marcus

(via jennyloggins)

gaksdesigns:

Yusuke Oono’s 360° Hand-cut Pop-Up Books.

(via fuckyeahillustrativeart)

Tags: inspiration

aymerydelamaisonfort:

Alphonse Mucha - Portrait of Jiri
Mucha was a Czech painter (1860-1939), best known for his decorative and illustrative work.

aymerydelamaisonfort:

Alphonse Mucha - Portrait of Jiri

Mucha was a Czech painter (1860-1939), best known for his decorative and illustrative work.

(via polyeucte-de-melitena)

Tags: paintings